ragpicker-and-poet:

Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du Mal, 1857Translated by Richard Howard, 1982
          Gentle reader, being - as you are -          a cautious man of uncorrupted tastes,          lay aside this disobliging work,          as orgiastic as it is abject.          Unless you’ve graduated from the schol          of Satan (devil of a pedagogue!)          the poems will be Greek to you, or else          you’ll set me down for one more raving fool.
          If, however, your impassive eye          can plunge into the chasms on each page,          read on, my friend: you’ll learn to love me yet.
          Inquiring spirit, fellow-sufferer          in search, even here, of your own Paradise,          pity me … If not, to Hell with you!
          - “Epigraph For A Banned Book”
View Larger

ragpicker-and-poet:

Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du Mal, 1857
Translated by Richard Howard, 1982

          Gentle reader, being - as you are -
          a cautious man of uncorrupted tastes,
          lay aside this disobliging work,
          as orgiastic as it is abject.

          Unless you’ve graduated from the schol
          of Satan (devil of a pedagogue!)
          the poems will be Greek to you, or else
          you’ll set me down for one more raving fool.

          If, however, your impassive eye
          can plunge into the chasms on each page,
          read on, my friend: you’ll learn to love me yet.

          Inquiring spirit, fellow-sufferer
          in search, even here, of your own Paradise,
          pity me … If not, to Hell with you!

          - “Epigraph For A Banned Book”


philamuseum:

Happy Birthday to Vassily Vassilyevich Kandinsky, the Russian artist credited with painting the first purely abstract works. Kandinsky’s creation of abstract work followed a long period of development and maturation of intense thought based on his artistic experiences. He called this devotion to inner beauty, fervor of spirit, and spiritual desire inner necessity; it was a central aspect of his art.”Circles in a Circle”, 1923, Vassily Kandinsky. View Larger

philamuseum:

Happy Birthday to Vassily Vassilyevich Kandinsky, the Russian artist credited with painting the first purely abstract works. Kandinsky’s creation of abstract work followed a long period of development and maturation of intense thought based on his artistic experiences. He called this devotion to inner beauty, fervor of spirit, and spiritual desire inner necessity; it was a central aspect of his art.

Circles in a Circle”, 1923, Vassily Kandinsky.


arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010

Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.

This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.

This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.


workman:

running-barefoot-thru-the-forest:

Seahenge, which is also known as Holme I, was a prehistoric monument located in the village of Holme-next-the-Sea, near Old Hunstanton in the English county of Norfolk. A timber circle with an upturned tree root in the centre, Seahenge was apparently built in the 21st century BC, during the early Bronze Age in Britain, most likely for ritual purposes.

The site consisted of an outer ring comprising fifty-five small split oak trunks forming a roughly circular enclosure around 7 by 6 metres (23 by 20 ft). Rather than being placed in individual holes, the timbers had been arranged around a circular construction trench. Their split sides faced inwards and their bark faced outwards (with one exception where the opposite is the case). One of the trunks on the south western side had a narrow Y fork in it, permitting access to the central area. Another post had been placed outside this entrance, which would have prevented anyone from seeing inside. The timbers were set in ground to a depth of 1-metre (3 ft 3 in) from the contemporary surface although how far they originally extended upwards is not known. In the centre of the ring was a large inverted oak stump.

Credits: x, x, x